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Figure 19

I’m Not a Vampire quartz vein – south-western side, view looking NW.

Figure 18

HyMap Hyperspectral imagery – Sericite/Mica/Illite Crystallinity in the Greater I’m Not a Vampire and area. Water content within illites and white micas can be measured by the ratio of H20 versus Al-OH absorption near 1950 nm and 2200 nm respectively – termed illite crystallinity (IX). Warmer colours (red/orange/yellow) generally indicate a higher temperature of sericite/mica crystallisation. Cooler colours (blues) commonly reflect areas of poorly crystalline micas (illites) characterised by high water and low Al-OH content.

Figure 17

HyMap Hyperspectral imagery – Advanced argillic alteration (ternary Pyrophyllite – Dickite – Kaolin) over the I Am the One prospect. Also shown are the locations of rock chip samples collected by Plutonic. The background image is a false colour composite (HyMap bands 16, 8 and 3 – equivalent to true colour air photo).

Figure 16

HyMap Hyperspectral imagery – Advanced argillic alteration (ternary Pyrophyllite – Dickite – Kaolin) over the Apotheosis prospect. Also shown are the locations of rock chip samples collected by Plutonic. The background image is a false colour composite (HyMap bands 16, 8 and 3 – equivalent to true colour air photo).

Figure 15

(a) Porphyry and (b) Epithermal Gold Fuzzy Logic favourability maps covering the Icarus prospect and surrounding areas (the field of view is the same in both images). Prospectivity models were constructed by combining several different spatial data ‘layers’, with each model input being carefully selected to represent a critical component of the mineral system. The resulting maps are a useful first-pass indicator of relative prospectivity and a powerful targeting tool.

Figure 14

HyMap Hyperspectral imagery – Advanced argillic alteration (ternary Pyrophyllite – Dickite – Kaolin) over the Camp Lake Bottom, McLovin and Loki prospects. Also shown are the locations of rock chip samples collected by Plutonic. The background image is a false colour composite (HyMap bands 16, 8 and 3 – equivalent to true colour air photo).

Figure 13

High-priority target areas at Plutonic’s Champion Project.

Figure 12

Typical advanced argillic outcrop from the Loki target area. Rock chips local to this outcrop returned elevated copper (to 396ppm), tellurium (to 0.93ppm), selenium (to 3.2ppm), molybdenum (to 3.1 ppm), germanium (to 2.75 ppm) and zinc (to 1240ppm).

Figure 11

Examples of breccias from Champion. (a) I’m Not a Vampire reef – Epizonal quartz outcrop – multi-veined breccia with strong crustiform banding and some comb quartz, (b) Angular quartz clasts in a matrix dominated by specular haematite – I’m Not a Vampire reef, (c) Quartz-haematite breccia – Asgard Dome North, (d) Sample Dam002, McLovin’ Prospect – Hydrothermal breccia with cockade textures, quartz matrix dominant, (e) I’m Not a Vampire reef –  cut hand specimen of multi-phase Infill breccia with cockade/colloform textures, fine chalcedonic banding, dark quartz, ex-sulphides.

Figure 10

Fuzzy Logic prospectivity modelling attempts to digitally combine large amounts of spatial data using sound logic and reasoning. It is an entirely knowledge-driven approach to computer-aided favourability mapping. The models are designed to reflect the geoscientists’ thoughts and ideas. Two distinct models have been prepared for the Champion Project; the results display relative favourability for (a) Low sulphidation epithermal mineral systems, and (b) Porphyry/high sulphidation mineral systems.

Figure 9

3D geochemical modelling of rock chip assays provide vectors towards areas of interest based on elemental abundances and trends in diagnostic elemental ratios. Also shown is Plutonic’s 3D inversion of magnetic data (interpreted as potential intrusive corridors) and a preliminary structural interpretation. 3D view looking NW.

Figure 8

Examples of geochemically anomalous rock samples and epithermal/hydrothermal quartz textures from the Champion Project.

Figure 7

View looking southwest, across plains covered by recent sedimentary cover and towards the mesas and outcropping quartz veins of the Saraya prospect. This area was selected for a trial Ultra Fine Fraction (UFF)  soil survey.

Figure 6

Examples of gridded Ultra Fine Fraction (UFF) orientation soil survey results (a) Gold – Au, (b) Silver – Ag and (c) Mercury – Hg.

Figure 5

HyMap Al-OH wavelength shift map. Spatial variation in the wavelength of a diagnostic electromagnetic absorption feature is a result of element substitution within the crystal lattice, reflecting the chemical conditions at the time of crystallisation. Warmer colours (red/orange) in the Al-OH wavelength shift map generally indicate more alkaline conditions. Cooler colours (blue/green) indicate higher Al content and more acidic conditions. Surface geochemical ‘highlights’ are also shown.

Figure 4

Structural setting of the Champion Project. Source: Geoscience Australia 1: 1 million-scale structure and regional interpretation by Plutonic Limited over Geoscience Australia Variable Reduction to Pole (VRTP) Magnetics V6, 2015.

Figure 3

Continental Scale architecture showing the distribution of Paleozoic rifts in close proximity to the G3 structural corridor, the “Tasman Line” separating stable Paleozoic continental rocks to the west from the accretionary orogen to the east and significant gold occurrences associated with these structural zones. Paleozoic rifts are commonly concealed by younger (post-Paleozoic) sedimentary basin sequences. The Champion Project area is interpreted as a rare exception.

Figure 2

Precambrian and early Palaeozoic provinces of the North Australian Craton. The Aileron Province, part of the Arunta Inlier is indicated by the black hashed area.

Figure 1

Plutonic’s Champion Project location map. Granted tenements are shown in dark grey, applications are shown in light grey.